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Borrego Springs, CA

Saturday, May 11, 2013

Will I ever get there?

I was up at almost the crack of dawn this morning because I wanted to take a window of opportunity to get to my next stop before the wind storm started.  We rolled out of the KOA right at 8:00 and headed north.  Seems the weather guessers were wrong once again, and the winds rolled in very shortly out of the north.  It seemed a struggle to move down the road, and I literally watched the gas gage move downward.

After about an hour and a half, I noticed that dreaded gap of light from the awning once again in my rear view mirror.  Shucks!  I slowed way down and exited the highway where I could get some gas.  My plan was to fill up, get the ladder out and push the awning back, and head onto my next destination.  What was I thinking?  At this point, the wind was blowing in the 30 mph range and I knew I couldn’t go on let alone fix the awning.

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Luckily, this gas station had a campground connected to it.  So here we are.  Stuck once again.  After only 60 miles, I was set up to spend the night by 10:30 in the morning!  The wind has been so strong that I couldn’t even put out the living room slide for fear the slide topper would rip off.  Emma has been as nervous as when we are in a terrible thunder and lightening storm. 

I didn’t even make it to Sioux Falls, so we are about 320 miles from Tamarac NWR, and I have a dilemma.  They are expecting me tomorrow, and one of the interns will stay on call to open the gates for me so I can get to the RV site.  I know I can call the intern, and tell her I can’t make it, but this journey has seemed to go on forever and ever.  I’m anxious to get there.  I guess I’ll just have to see how the winds are in the morning. 

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Along about 5:30, the winds had abated to about 25 mph, so I set up the ladder to try to fix the awning, again.  You’ll just have to imagine me perched near the top pounding on the arm.  At least this time I could lean back against the slide out for stability.  I got it in, but I sure hope I don’t have to stop every 75 miles or so to do this tomorrow.  Cross your fingers for me. 

I would have gotten on the roof to see if I could secure the arm except for two things.  First, it scares me to go up there, and second, I figured I might get blown off and flown down to the Gulf of Mexico!  I like gulf shrimp, but I sure don’t want to be one!  Surprised smile

Thanks for stopping by… talk to you later,  Judy

P.S.  Hope you know that I appreciate being able to vent my frustrations on you all…

29 comments:

  1. Vent away...there are times in life you have to just allow life to get in the way and then be grateful that it did because it is holding you back for a reason. You may not see it...you may never know but there is one. Just let go and let it all go just the way it is suppose to go. Oh, yeah and enjoy it too since you may never come that way again!

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  2. Jerry n Kimberley said it before me. Vent Away! We're here to listen and cheer you on. If I were in your shoes ... I'd call them and tell them you're not going to make it tomorrow. The stress of rushing is not good when you have a long drive ahead of you. Better a day late.

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  3. Argh! I'm feeling your frustration! Don't let the pressure get to you. They'll wait for you. You are worth the wait!

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  4. Everyone needs to vent once in a while. If the awning issue is an ongoing problem it might be wise to tie it near the top of the arm for the remainder of the trip. Then you can have looked after once you're set up. Be Safe and Enjoy!

    It's about time.

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  5. Sorry the awning is giving you grief----soooo frustrating. Just take your time and be careful.

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  6. Relax, the world won't end if you don't make it tomorrow. Calm your nerves relax and then take things a step at a time. Be safe.

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  7. Man can I relate to your frustration. A couple years back we had major awning problems. Opened 2X on the highway and we finally duck taped it til we got home. Those things can drive you to drink. Speaking of which, go pour yourself a good one and sit down and chill!!!!!

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  8. You rarely vent so I guess it's your turn. I would be more concerned about the awning than arrival time. Maybe duct tape if you can't get a strap or belt up there to secure it. Try to keep the tape on the arm so it doesn't damage the fiberglass.

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  9. That is frustrating! All of it - the awning, the wind, the delays.

    I've been in Missouri for a couple of days and the wind here has been hellacious as well.

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  10. Jimmy sez tying the awning at the top would be a good thing. Duck tape maybe. You need something that will hold it together. Your ladder looks too short to get the "fix" high on the arm, and we'd worry about you climbing up too high. We think you should go to a repair place and get 'er fixed permanently. Dangerous (and danged frustrating!!!) the way it is now. Feel yer pain... sigh...!

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  11. Take your time...Awning is the first thing that needs addressing...Get there and find someone to help you out.

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  12. Venting is no problem. Otherwise we'd all wonder why we have all the troubles. If the winds quit, could you do 320 in a day? That sounds like PDD. Would you want to do 320?? Especially IF you have to stop every 75 miles for the awning? I know I wouldn't but you are more of a trooper than I. Hope you get a good night's sleep. I do think it was a gift that the gas station had a campground. How often does that happen?

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  13. Can you use a broom to push the arm closed instead of your ladder? Can you strap the arm in place with some Velcro or even rope or string wrapped around many times? I'd hate to see you stopping that often to secure it again and again.

    Good luck, so wish I was nearby to help you. :c(

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  14. I'm glad you were able to find a gas station with campground when you needed it, even if it was 10:30 in the morning. I would be so frustrated, and I know you were as well.

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  15. Joe uses a short bungie chord to keep our awning arm tightly secured when ever we are moving. don't know if that helps any but thought I'd throw my 2cents worth in too. And like you, I wouldn't want to be climbing around up on that roof either windy or not. I don't like heights.

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  16. I would get someone to work on the awnimg for you! Falling off the ladder eould not be good;( I have been there and done that :(

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  17. I agree with Chuck. Falling off the ladder would be no fun and the no fun would be a lasting reminder of being no fun. Wise traveler that you are, get there later.

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  18. Awnings are a pain in the ..... Hope you get it resolved soon, I drove through Oklahoma in the wind and hope to never have to drive in that kind of wind again.

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  19. Vent away. I would never get up on that roof...wind or no wind!

    As I write this, I am praying that you are on the road and arrive safely at Tamarac NWR.

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  20. What everybody else said! I hope the weather and your awning and the highways conspire today to get you much farther down the road, if not to your destination. We have not yet experienced awning troubles - something to look forward to, I guess! Ha!

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  21. I cringe thinking of you standing on that ladder with no one to steady it for you. 320 miles to go, sounds like a two day trip at best. If you fall and break your neck, you won't make it anyway, so you might as well stay safe.

    How about calling a mobile Rv tech out. If he can't fix the awning properly, maybe he can make a temporary repair to keep you safe on the road. If that thing unfurled while you were driving on the interstate, things could get ugly. The NWR can wait. I'm sure you aren't the first person that had issues and had to come a little later than scheduled.

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  22. Vent away! You have such courage! I am so thankful the service station had a campground there!

    Hope you get lots of miles in today!

    Happy Mother's Day!

    Hugs to Emma...

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  23. I have to agree with everybody else - get there a day later. PDD can be hazardous to your health you know. We want you to be safe. And please vent whenever you want to or need to. That's what friends are for.

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  24. Whatever you decide to do, please do it safely. It sounds like that awning needs a permanent type fix of some kind but the idea of bungee cords or rope as a temporary measure might be worthwhile. 320 miles is a lot of driving in a MH for one day but if the weather's good, it is doable. Good luck.

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  25. I am commenting this morning (Sunday..Happy Mother's Day) at 10:30AM...Hope this finds you and Emma on the road with the awning tied up somehow and soon safe at your destination...Numero Uno, get that damn awning fixed! You're making me very nervous!!!! ;-)

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  26. I hope you make it there safely. I'll tell you, Judy, I'm still taping a cut down popsicle stick (thanks for that tip!)on my thumb because I drove in those high winds in February. I still can't bend my thumb, and I'll never drive in high winds again. I'll probably need surgery. So... It it were me, I'd make the phone call - they will understand. But you're probably already on the road. :)

    Happy Mother's Day to you!

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  27. I know just what you are talking about. Our trip to Maine was the same way...rain, fog, and bad roads. We are now here at Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge and need the refuge just like the animals!!! I hope you are at your destination now, safe and sound...Happy Mother's Day to you.

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  28. We tie ours also with a small, short bungee cord every time we move.
    Sending safe thoughts your way for today! You get there when you get there!

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  29. Nice post.Thanks for sharing this in your blog

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