.

.
Borrego Springs, CA

Saturday, May 23, 2015

Learning about tide pools

I was at my seabird observation station for an hour and a half this morning, before I packed things up and headed off for a tide pool hike. 

_MG_1984

I got to the South Beach Trail a little early so I could make my way down the steep decline to the beach without holding up the scheduled tour group.  The group had adult campers and young junior ranger program participants.  I went on the tour because I didn’t know a thing about tide pools and I was eager to learn.

_MG_1985

I was hoping to see and learn about as many of the species on the information board as possible.  Here’s what I saw.

_MG_1990

First up was a sea star and anemones.  Sea stars is their proper name.  I grew up calling them star fish, but they aren’t fish after all, of course.

_MG_1994

Now these sea anemones sure didn’t look like what I expected, but that’s because the very low tide meant they were high and dry.  They kind of curl up when they’re above the water and exposed to the air.

_MG_1997

This, and the next two pics show what they look like when they’re under water.  Now that’s more what I expected.

_MG_2000

They do come in a variety of colors.  I can’t wait to show them to the grandgirls when they come to visit in July.

_MG_2007

I learned something with this shot.  It’s better to take pictures of these anemones in the shade to show the true colors.  Aren’t they neat?

_MG_2003

That’s Cheyenne, the park interpretive intern, showing the little ones a sea star.  Funny thing about a couple of these would be junior rangers.  Two of them were on the tour with their grandparents.  Well, grandpa was constantly hounding them not to get their feet wet.  What??  You take two youngsters to the beach where we had to cross an inlet through the water, and you don’t want them to get their shoes wet?  In my opinion, that’s like asking pigs not to wallow in mud.  Lighten up, Gramps!

_MG_2010

          Of course, the sea star was returned to its original position in the sand to await the tide coming in.

Gooseneck Barnacles?

Did you know these are gooseneck barnacles?  I didn’t.  I think they’re kind of neat when you take a close look at them.

_MG_2013 _MG_2016

The last big find of the hike was a gumboot chiton (I think).  They kind of curl of in defense.  The kids weren’t too crazy about this creature.

_MG_2020

As we headed back to the trail up the hill, we once again had to cross this inlet.  Good old gramps carried his young grandson over the water and set him down on the other side.  I had to laugh out loud as the young whippersnapper ran right back to the inlet and jumped in saying, “I can cross it myself, grandpa!” 

Thanks for stopping by… talk to you later,  Judy

29 comments:

  1. Kids are too funny, aye?? You found some VERY beautiful things in your tidal pools. Mum loved the picture of the anemone taken in the shade with the mauve tips. Beautiful. What's Emma do while you're out. I'd bark!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love this post.... tidal pools are such a wealth of critters.... what a fun hike this must have been.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I guess I'm old fashioned because I still call them star fish. Anemone are one of my favorite sea critters. It's too bad the little boys grandpa wouldn't let him play and have fun.

    ReplyDelete
  4. We took a tide pool tour in Olympia National Park one time--loved it!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I try to remember to call them sea stars, but fail more often than not ... too many years of calling them star fish I guess.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I laughed about Gramps! Telling a kid not to get his or her feet wet just insures that they will. And once the feet are wet it's likely that they will then throw caution to the wind.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I enjoyed the tide pools in San Diego. Really a neat experience for a grandma from Wisconsin. We never get too old if we are always learning and then sharing. Or maybe just watching the youngins.

    ReplyDelete
  8. We spent hours on the coast exploring the tide pools. Just fascinating! But it's hard not to get your feet wet;-)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Being an inland girl, it's fun to take your tour with you and learn all these things. Why is it so hard to let kids just be kids. Little boys and water are an unbeatable combination.

    ReplyDelete
  10. So interesting - thanks. Isn't it interesting watching other families interact?

    ReplyDelete
  11. This is all so interesting. Including the family. The best part about visiting the beach is getting wet! Glad the little boy could "do it himself!!" LOL.

    ReplyDelete
  12. We took a tide pool hike also. Just fascinating all the beautiful colors that we don't normally see. That is the first time we ever heard of sea star.
    Your grandgirls are going to love that area.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Tell all parents and grandparents everywhere that kids need to be able to actually experience everything. That includes puddles. mud trees - climbing- and getting scratch up picking blackberries. Keeping kids safe is killing them.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I love the tide pools at Harris Beach. We can't wait to see how Mattie does down on the beach. We have yet to learn if she likes water or not. You sure look like you are enjoying yourself in spite of the chills. Great post, Judy

    ReplyDelete
  15. Did you know that if you poke your finger into an "open" anemone, it will close around your finger? Kinda cool (but you're not supposed to bother the critters, I know). Tide pools are great sport.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Now I am really hooked! We just ordered an under water camera for pictures at the tide pools in San Diego next year! I love, love, LOVE, your adventures and oh my, so much interesting info! Thank you Judy!

    P.S. Grandpa needs a chill pill!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Thanks for sharing your Tide Pool Tour with us! Amazing creatures how they survive under water as well as above it when the tide is out! Looks like you had a beautiful day for it! I agree with Gay & Joe: Grandpa needs to chill! He was once a little boy. :)

    ReplyDelete
  18. For once I was able to identify an example of wildlife posted on your blog. I've seen many starfish over the years on the beach where we lived. :c)

    ReplyDelete
  19. I think that the tidal pools at Harris Beach were the first that Teri and I ever explored. Wonderful memories!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Your sea star is just gorgeous. I love tide pools and sure wish I was on the west coast to see them. Beautiful pictures. Love the gramps story. I thought that's what grandparents were for, to let the kids do things their parents say "be careful" and "don't" to.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Loving your new gig almost as much as you. Keep up the good work, and pics.:-)

    ReplyDelete
  22. Very nice blog and great pictures. I will be seeing next entries.
    Everyone is invited to see my blog entries at this address

    ReplyDelete
  23. wow. . .I can't wait to see a tide pool. . .we did see some in Maine, but they never had much in them. . .these look fascinating. . .looking forward to the experience!

    ReplyDelete
  24. I'm with Marilyn, let the kids have some fun and get dirty for cripes sake! Kids are kinetic learners, the more free they are to move around and touch their environment the more connected to it they will be and the more they will get out of it.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Do you like live sex webcams? Take a peep at BongaCams.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Nice post.Thanks for sharing this in your blog

    ReplyDelete