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Borrego Springs, CA

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Got to smell some dragon’s breath today.

There was no fog, and it wasn’t raining this morning, but the skies were heavily overcast.  We headed out for Yellowstone again anyway.  On the agenda today was to visit Hayden Valley in hopes of seeing some wildlife.  Any time I’ve been here in the past that valley is a good bet.  Not today.  Not one bison, elk, wolf or bear.  We did see a couple of trumpeter swans, but after the last two summers at Tamarac, I’ve had much better views there.

78 On the way to Imperial NWR

Along the way, we stopped at the Mud Volcano area.  That bubbling gray mud is really something to watch.  I’m thinking that the last time I was here in 2010 that I didn’t stop at this area.  I sure didn’t remember the Dragon’s Mouth Spring.  There is a platform you can stand on right over the opening where the steam and chemicals belch out from underground.  A man and I were standing there when a great belch of steam came out.  Oh my.  After breathing it, the man and I looked at each other and said, “yuck!”  If that’s what a dragon’s breath smells like, I hope I never run into another one.

A commenter yesterday asked how the crowds are in Yellowstone at this time of the year.  Well, it may be past Labor Day, but the crowds are still here.  Not as many kids, of course, but lots of foreign languages going on.  There are huge numbers of Asian visitors, and I hate to say that I’ve found many of them rather rude.  Makes me wonder if perhaps they didn’t learn in Kindergarten to take turns and not push people out of the way.  I’m not crazy about large crowds, and when those huge tourist buses arrive I kind of cringe.

Because of road closures, we turned around after the Gull Point Drive on Yellowstone Lake, and headed back toward home.  It was afternoon by this time, and the sun was finally struggling to make an appearance. 

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A good time to take the rim drive to the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.  I remember hiking to the overlook of the lower falls way back in 1970.  This time I took my walking stick, and Kurt was quick to point out to me that I was breaking the law by using a stick.  Winking smile

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                                              This view is one of my favorites in the whole park. 

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                                    I had to get a picture of Kurt with the falls in the background.

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The rainbow-like colors of the rocks in this area are so beautiful, and at the bottom is the Yellowstone River rushing through it.  No wildlife pictures again today, but we’ve got one day left.  Tomorrow we’re off to see the Mammoth Hot Springs.

Thanks for stopping by… talk to you later,  Judy 

22 comments:

  1. Love the "grand canyon" and everything about good ol' Yellowstone. We, too, were a bit surprised at the rudeness of the asian tourists, who will push old folks out of the way to get that So Important Picture.... Tour buses are usually a bad sign....

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  2. We met our daughter their two years ago. She had never seen Yellowstone or the canyon. Just watching our daughter get so excited at each turns gives me a feeling that we know what you are seeing in Kurt during this adventure. What a view.

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  3. No big wildlife:( That must mean they are not blocking the roads at least:) I have observed the same thing with Asian tourists, not just here but in other countries we have traveled too. Perhaps it is how they survive in the very crowded countries they call home?

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  4. We were lucky with our most recent visit to Yellowstone - we saw all kinds of wildlife. I joked at the time that the zoo trucks dropped them off at various points for visitors to see....almost like Disney characters....LOL Watch for the animal delivery vans! ENJOY!!!

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  5. My son says that standing in line or taking turns is not part of the Asian culture. They tend to rush in mass to board a bus or all push in at once to get into a store door when it is opened.

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  6. I've never noticed rude behavior with Asian people, Cubans yes, Asians no.

    Why can't you bring your walking stick?

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  7. For your other readers, when we were there this time of year we got lucky and found the crowds to be very low. Maybe we missed all the bus dropoff times! It was crowded at the viewpoints for the canyon though. When we were at Artist Point we turned onto the trail right behind it and NOT A SINGLE PERSON! I wanted to keep going, Wayne wanted to avoid bears. Next time I'm insisting!

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  8. Having been in Asia, although quite a few years ago, I was struck by the fact that nowhere in the US or any other part of the world were there so many people. On the streets of Tokyo and Seoul people just have to jostle each other when passing or moving anywhere. It's accepted that there will be jostling - I don't think they mean to be rude, but it's their way of life to have to mve about in a crush of people all the time.

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  9. Love the picture of you breaking the law. That Kurt is really on top of things isn't he? And the falls too! Mammoth is one of my favorite places in Yellowstone and my favorite campground too. Hope the skies clear up so you can get run over by the elk that live there.

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  10. Your photographs of the "Canyon" are awesome--you really picked up the colors. We too find the Asian people to be very rude but like some of the other comments said it is their culture--but it doesn't make me like it when three Asian people come down the trail abreast and won't yield any of the space to others.

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  11. I remember those mud volcanoes - wouldn't want to fall into one of those!

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  12. I'm new to reading your wonderful blog, just found it the other day. Those rude Asian tourist were most likely Chinese. This summer my teenage son and I traveled to Japan for his school trip. While there, we experienced many of those rude Chinese. One walked right into me with her umbrella, and she was looking right at me as she did it. I just yelled at her since I knew that she wasn't Japanese. No Japanese would do such a thing without apologizing profusely. The Japanese aren't rude like that. The Japanese were having some difficultly dealing with the Chinese rude behavior too. We heard it in the Japanese conversations. I read your post to my son, and he agrees that it's the Chinese. All I can say is that they are making the rude Americans look like saints. Your picture of the falls is stunning, and I enjoyed your information on Dragon's Mouth Spring- new to me. I'm enjoying reading your old posts.

    Thanks! -Monica
    P.S. Here is my blog on hiking: http://tootlingaroundamt.blogspot.com/

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  13. I love your shot of the canyon and the waterfalls. It is beautiful!

    www.travelwithkevinandruth.com

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  14. Now Kurt has the evidence to prove he visited Yellowstone! Bummer about the lack of critters that so define Yellowstone.

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  15. If that's what dragon's breath smells like, count your lucky stars you didn't get a whiff of the tail while trying to get a "The End" picture... :cD

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  16. Not only are Asians rude they are also terrible tippers according to my daughter who has been a waitress in Seattle. Even in higher class restaurants where a minimum of 15% is the rule and 20% not uncommon the Asians leave nothing or less than 10%! Wish they would stay in their own country. SKP Hugs, Karen

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  17. I think it's particularly neat that you and your brother enjoy time together and hiking and traveling! My brother and I loved each other but seemed to have nothing in common and so I enjoy you and Kurt

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  18. surely, surely, surely you will at least see Elk at Mammoth. . .it's their favorite hangout. . .right? Fingers crossed for ya. . .

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  19. We posed for a picture on that same rock!!! Back on the net and have a lot of catching up to do.

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  20. Awwsome picture of the falls and canyon. Wish we were there.

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  21. Wow, gorgeous picture. I've forgotten what a small percent of people who visit Yellowstone ever see much more than what they can see from their car. You're a smart lady. :)

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  22. Nice Post.Thanks for Sharing this in your Blog

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