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Borrego Springs, CA

Saturday, November 23, 2013

Changes

I remember my first winter on the road in 2006.  I was in Washington and Oregon.  Every night, I’d put on more and more layers of clothing as the temperature dropped outside the rig.  That was before my extend-a-stay propane tank, and I kept the thermostat at 68*.  Of course that meant the real temperature inside of that first motorhome was ten degrees colder than that.

I’ve got a better insulated rig now, and an extend-a-stay tank so I don’t have to pack up and move the rig to refill the propane, and I’m seven years older.  For me, the older I’ve gotten the more the cold effects my comfort.  Changes.

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                         Fulvous Whistling Ducks (and two coots) They really do make a whistling sound.

I now keep the thermostat at 79* in the evening before I go to bed.  The real temperature is about 73*, and my old bones and joints appreciate it.  There’s a rainy, very windy, cold front moving through right now, and the temps outside will probably dip down into the 30’s tonight.  I was born and raised a northern girl, but now I don’t want to experience cold.  Changes.

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                                                          White Ibis and Roseate Spoonbill

My attitude has changed over the years.  I’ve grown to like my creature comforts.  When I first hit the road, I thought I’d be doing lots of boondocking.  That’s not the way things worked out for me.  While I still haven’t been able to talk myself into trying one of those RV resort type places that many retirees enjoy for an extended amount of time, I do not want to boondock any longer.  I like my hook-ups, satellite TV, internet, and heat/AC.  I guess that’s why National Wildlife Refuges work so well for me.

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As winter approaches, there are also noticeable changes in nature.  The high winds are helping these cattails propagate.  If you look really closely, you can see the individual seeds about to blow off to hopefully land on fertile ground.

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And just look how some expired vine had intertwined with this cattail.  The seeds are clinging to everything.  What wonders there are to observe if we go slow enough.  One of the beauties of observing the changing seasons.

I’m hoping the rain stops by tomorrow so I can show my visitors some of the things I find so wonderful about Anahuac NWR.  If not, we’ll have to change our plans…

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                                                                              THE END!!

Thanks for stopping by… talk to you later,  Judy

36 comments:

  1. The Roseate Spoonbills are so beautiful. Is their plumage pink from diet or are they just pink?

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  2. Especially love that last shot of the spoonbill. Been thinking about your "assignment" to celebrate the 50th anniversary. Wonder how many photos you've taken in your several times there that "correspond" to photos in all the Annual Narratives that are probably in somewhere in the refuge office.... and how neat it would be to see the comparison of the changes over the years.... see... this segued right into your theme of "changes" ;-)

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  3. Love the pics! And the story as I live in S. OR. I know how cold it is in the winter!

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  4. We, too, enjoy our comforts and full hook-ups are really important. We have done very little boondocking. It is good to read other bloggers who feel the same. We have decided to retire from volunteering and we enjoy spending the winter in one of those resorts. It's great.

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  5. I agree with the changes. I like my creature comforts too but miss some things about travel especially spoonbills!

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  6. As always, your photos are wonderful. Ah, yes, changes. One of the ways to remain young (at heart at least) is to embrace change. Believe it or not, I think I do that in my life. I hadn't always felt this way, but I'm so glad it's happened. Life is full of changes and surprises. We can embrace them or we can be miserable. I choose the former.

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  7. Love your pics Judy! I agree, the cold weather no longer suits me either! Some changes are good!

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  8. I guess going to the barn in whatever temperatures has hardened me a bit. We will see when I fall into your way of living. When I do, it will be in AZ!

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  9. I keep thinking I want to do more boondocking but I know I only do it when the temperatures are between 50 and 80. HA!! I grew up in Ohio too cold for me and left at age 20 for warmer climes. Now I'm looking for even warmer ones. Those Roseate pictures are just gorgeous. STAY WARM!!

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  10. The colors in the last shot of the spoonbill are so pretty...such a nice contrast. Even though it's nearly winter, the colors in the picture remind me of spring! We so agree...full hook-up for us! We have never even tried the boon docking experience! AND, we don't like the cold either. The rain you are having now is headed to Freeport, Fl and it should be a lot cooler next week. UGH!

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  11. I totally understand where you are coming from! To us, boondocking is 30 amps!!! We love our FHU 50 amp sites. It doesn't have to be fancy, it just has to have good power, water pressure and sewer. If there is no view, we'll deal with it. If there is dirt roads, we'll deal with it. If it's the middle of nowhere, we'll deal with it. Just give us those 50 amps! :)
    On another note, you just might want to try Florida. It's 80 here. We haven't had to worry about heat; only A/C!

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  12. I guess I'm the weird one here because I like chilly weather - not real cold though I do like the opportunity to wear my down jacket once in a while.

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  13. Craig likes the coach a bit warmer than I do. We keep the overnight temp at 63, but turn it up to 68 when one of us gets up to start the coffee. He, she, then goes back to bed to read the news and blogs. By the time we get up the coach is nice and warm.

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  14. I forgot to add that the overnight temps have been 40 - 50.

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  15. Sherry and I are on the same page about boondocking weather temperatures. But I also desire it to be a dry climate for boondocking. In dry climates I can comfortably drop to 45 at night and up to 85. Boondocking is not my goal, having tooooo much fun is the goal.

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  16. Yesterday was opening day of deer hunting here. The winds were blowing and it was 6 degrees at sunrise. I'm pouring over atlas's to find our route to Arizona, another month of this stuff and we'll be outta here for warmer climates. I love to be warm!!!

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  17. Your photos are beautiful.

    When we started traveling five years ago, Paul was all gun ho about boon docking; me not so much. I have seen an amazing change in him. He now suggests we stop at the occasional Walmart. We both enjoy our comforts of home!

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  18. We too are ready to head south for warmer weather but will wait until after Christmas this year. Love your roseate spoonbill photos!

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  19. Count Nannie and Bubba (Nickie's sister & hubby) in the Full Hookups group. We love to camp, but we also love our comfort.....

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  20. I think I want to try boondocking if I ever get on the road...but I can see the benefits of having utilities! Enjoy your weekend with friends!

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  21. Boondocking? If some RVers want to spend thousands of dollars, maybe even hundreds of thousands, on an RV with all the comforts of home and then go park in a place where they can't use them then that's just fine by me. I happen to like using all the comforts of home I've paid for in our 5'er and that includes 50amp power, long hot showers with city water hook-ups, an electric fireplace and sewer connections. From reading many, many blogs it seems that boondocking is more of an 'idea' and a 'romantic goal' than an actual practice with RV'ers. I don't know the number of actual 100% boondockers out there but it must be very, very small. BUT, if that's what a person likes to do then go for it. I admire those who can do it and not just talk about doing it.

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  22. It was below zero Thursday and Friday nights. Today so far it is 15 degrees and windy..it has been bitterly cold. I don't like the cold either. Not much for snow here, just a little on the ground. Looks much warmer in Texas with open water and all. Enjoy! :)

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  23. Love the bird photos, especially your header! I know what you mean about changes. I seem to be getting hardier, though, rather than wanting more, like full hook-ups. I've always wanted to be a Mountain Mama, as my son called me when I lived in the mountains with snow, a well for water, wood stove for heat and egg-laying chickens, working out of my home. My all-time favorite house. I've always wanted to go even more "mountain woman" than that, and dry-camping is the closest I'm going to get at this point. I hardly ever use the A/C or heater, Katie and I just dress warmer and get under a nice warm lap blanket. If it's in the 50's or low 60's in The Palms, I turn on the Wave 3 propane heater. At night we have no heat. I have a down comforter that's almost always warm enough. If not, I add a quilt.

    I'm loving it now, but can see a different life in the next few years, maybe staying in an RV park with hookups and a laundromat, within walking distance of a town. Maybe a little car. That actually sounds nice now, but I'm not ready yet. I do think about it from time to time. :)

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  24. Totally agree, Judy...While Den and I do not enjoy the "resort" type of camping, dry camping isn't my thing either...We get by just fine with water and electric...and a honey wagon...And that means we stay at lots of Army Corps parks or National forests..half price camping and always a nice big site around either trees, a body of water..or both!..( our electric fireplace has saved a bundle on propane!)

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    1. That's interesting. Hadn't thought about Army Corps parks...

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  25. You need to add one more item to your cold weather equipment. An electric blanket. We just bought a new one, we wore out one already after our first two years on the road and in plenty of ccccold weather. It does help cut down on the propane usage. Like you, I have the Extend A Stay kit and a small tank. Since we're over 25 miles to the nearest propane fill, I'm thinking of buying another tank because it's starting to look like we may be here until April (thanks to the VA).

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  26. Beautiful pictures. Thanks for sharing !

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  27. Exactly, Judy ... I get a bit of flack from a few who somehow can't believe I've hung up Homer's wheels... but I'm just flat out tired of driving and finding places to park or stay ... This growing older business changes a lot of what to do's. It is no longer fun to be cold and wet or needing a shower and a cup of hot chocolate and a good ol Sunday afternoon movie on the movie channel.... just doing whatever...

    I enjoy doing whatever ... whether it's in a house or motel or in Homer but I enjoy my comforts... like heat and running water and toilet and ... it's 30 DEGREES and FREEEZING in little ol Little Rock!!! I went out to turn Homer on and say hey.... and all those adventurous nights came to mind ... I wouldn't trade them for anything ... but as I came back in my house? ... gonna make some cornbread.. been cooking beans and ... watching an old movie on the TV with Spencer Tracy and Van Johnson ... in my recliner ... just made coffee

    sigh....

    LOVE the pictures... that is fascinating with the cattails!!! the spoonbill? how pink is he/she... beautiful!

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    1. I have been curious how long people that go full timing do it...when does a brick and mortar home start calling?

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    2. It sort of depends on the people. Some may last for a few months others have been living the Fulltimer life for years.

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  28. Good post! For better or worse change is always a part of our lives.

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  29. It's cold here in north Texas too. Great shots of the spoonbills.

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  30. Great post as usual. As far as the thermostat in an RV goes we think it should just be letters, say set it at 'G' if you are comfortable, the temp on the thermostat never matches the real temp.

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  31. You could try a cheap cruise for a change of scenery sometime - all the creature comforts, including round-the-clock food! Cheap tickets out of Galveston...

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  32. Nice Post. Thanks for sharing this in Your blog

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